Responding to Evil

It is the middle of winter.  The pine trees have snow covered tips.  The ground is filled with the beauty of snow.  You are walking your dog and he is enjoying bouncing up and down in the white fluffiness of his surroundings.  As your walk ends, you enter into your warm home.  The radiators are teeming with beautiful heat.  You remove your jacket and snow covered boots.  The dog runs in circles showing his love towards being outside.  Your wife asks you if you want something hot to drink.  With a smile on your face and warmth in your heart, you acknowledge the desire for hot chocolate.  As your wife prepares your warm drink, you lean over to give her a kiss.  Then it happens.  ZAP!  The biggest electrical shock that can happen between two people occurs.  You both yell out “OUCH” and try to enjoy each other from a distance.

We shouldn’t be surprised at that story.  It is a little known fact that in the winter time, there are more electrical shocks due to static than other times of the year.  The air is dry.  The friction between warm clothes and our skin, combined with low humidity, creates an environment that can become…you know…a bit shocking.

There are times, we will experience things that hurt us.  Sometimes the hurt is small and sometimes the hurt is much larger.  But should we be surprised when the hurt comes?  Should we be shocked when the world does things that not only hurt us but hurt others who cannot speak for themselves?  Here is what the apostle Peter told churches throughout Asia during his time in ministry…

“Dear friends, don’t be surprised at the fiery trials you are going through, as if something strange were happening to you.  Instead, be very glad – for these trials make you partners with Christ in His suffering, so that you will have the wonderful joy of seeing his glory when it is revealed to all the world.” – 1 Peter 2:12-13 (NLT)

So where did Peter come up with this idea of not being shocked?  Why would he tell others that what is happening in and around their world should be of no surprise?  Here is what Peter heard from Jesus…

“Remember what I told you: A servant is not greater than his master.  If they persecuted me, they will persecute you also.  If they obeyed my teaching, they will obey yours also.  They will treat you this way because of my name, for they do not know the one who sent me.  If I had not come and spoken to them, they would not be guilty of sin; but now they have no excuse for their sin.” – John 15:20-22 (NIV)

Peter was simply passing along Jesus’ message to the churches.  Peter had been through a lot.  First, he left his livelihood to follow Jesus, said some things he shouldn’t have, denied Jesus, was restored to Jesus, learned to overcome his prejudices and was jailed and beaten for the Gospel.  Many of Peter’s experiences were hurtful ones, but not shocking ones.

We too should not be shocked when the world does things that are against the teachings of Jesus.  In fact, we should expect it.  And when they do these things, most likely, we or someone we know will be hurt by it.  We will feel the pain of suffering in those moments, but what should our focus be?  Should we focus on the disobedient and evil acts of the world?  Or, should we focus our attention somewhere else?

Jesus told his disciples, “They will treat you this way because of my name…”  This is why Peter said, “Instead, be very glad – for these trials make you partners with Christ in His suffering, so that you will have the wonderful joy of seeing his glory when it is revealed to all the world.”

It sounds contradictory but it is true.  As we see the entire world tumbling into chaos and disrepair, we should be glad.  Not because of the problems, but because we know that once this world ends, those of us who know Jesus Christ as Savior will be spending eternity with Him.  No more suffering or pain.  No more sickness or death.   Our gladness, our joy does not come from the circumstances around us or the experiences we may face.  It does not come from the ability to do things we never thought we could do.  Our joy and gladness comes from Jesus Christ.  Our gladness and joy in Jesus Christ allows us to focus on His work, on His end results.  It is Jesus who lets us see that whatever happens in this world, it does not affect the final outcome.

Does this mean we need to shy away from being involved?  Certainly not!  In fact, it means we need to be involved all the more.  We are a light on the hill.  We are salt given by God to the earth.  Therefore, our involvement in speaking up for righteousness and justice is still needed.  Voting for those who stand for what God says is right is more important now than it ever has been before.  But as we do those things and get involved in those arenas, we need to remember that our focus is still sharing the good news of Jesus Christ.  That is our primary goal.

We may serve in politics, but we serve God all the more.  We may work in public service, but we work by sharing the Gospel with those who are hurting.  We may be the owner of a business, but it is God who owns that business and expects us to use that business for His glory.  No matter what we do, no matter how we are hurt, we must remember Jesus’ words…”It is finished.”

Jesus completed the work we could not.  Jesus saves, we do not.  Jesus knows what is going on in the world, even if we do not.  Therefore, we should not be shocked or surprised about how the world is rebelling because Jesus is not surprised or shocked.

Instead of focusing on the issues that hurts, let’s focus on the Savior that gives life.  Let us all serve our country the best way we can by focusing our efforts on not just standing for what is right, but by serving others with our actions, showing them the love of Christ.

Let’s all do what is right, by sharing the Gospel and showing the Gospel through our loving actions toward a lost and dying world.  And if the entire world decides not to respond any longer to the Gospel, don’t be shocked, be glad, for the Savior is on His way.

God bless and encourage someone today.

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